The Worm Factory cheapest price on the net. 80.00

The Worm Factory in Dawsonville Ga. 30534 Made in U.S.A.

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I dont like to ship in holiday weeks, seems like postal workers get slack. sorry for this inconveineance.

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on June 26, 2014 at 9:20 AM Comments comments (0)

I dont like to ship in holiday weeks, seems like postal workers get slack. sorry for this inconveineance.

Spring time, has sprung

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on June 7, 2014 at 7:25 AM Comments comments (0)

The last few weeks have been, very, very busy for me. I have found myself doing about 2 class's per week, aveage.

I would like to report, that I am getting rich from doing them, but the truth is, I give several free to summer school class's, VBS, and local groups. as long as they are local.

If you would like to schdule a group, to learn more about earthworms, vermiculture and the benifits, shoot me an email. most group price's avg 150.00 for local groups, can do here or there. We can adjust for gas or extra's if needed.

herronfarms@gmail.com


African Nightcrawlers Eudrilus Eugeniae will start shipping monday

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on April 9, 2014 at 7:40 PM Comments comments (0)

African Nightcrawlers Eudrilus Eugeniae will start shipping monday,

It has been a very long and cold winter, I and many other have lost lots of worms due to the extreem cold.

It set records at many place's including here. 2 deg. one morning, for metro Atlanta, that is unherd of.

the trucks carring the mail from post to post are not heated, and it turned out to be the weekest link, even with heat packs and insulated box's.

5 good freinds and fellow worm farmers, very large. just threw in the towel, so, this should make for an interesting year, to say the least.

I have had the phone ringing off the hook, and the email is unbearable. worm grower's and supplyers everywhere, are looking for more souce's. people wanting 400 pounds per week, 100 pounds per week and it dosent seem to stop. thats a lot of worms folks..........with that much demand, and so little supply, I had no choice but to raise my price's......I am sorry, but it cost me more to replenish my stock as well.

with the new MMJ market, it has opened people's eyes, to how good worm tea, and casting's realy are.

worms, realy do, eat my garbage, I havent paid for, or needed garbage pick up for over 4 years now. it hit 36.00 per month, that was it......thats about 450.00 per year....instead, I feed my worms my garbage.

worm crap by the pound or ton

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on August 17, 2013 at 11:30 AM Comments comments (0)

 I am always tickled by the people that call and ask for the price on a truck load of worm castings. Most of these people are well educated people, great gardeners and just looking to save money.........

Problem is, I then have to spend about an hour or more, explaining why they don't need a pickup truck full. Let me try to explain, please overlook the typo's and spelling as I am not a journalist.

For starters, most "real" worm farms in Ga. may produce a yard or even two per year, of castings. If they claim to have tons and tons of castings(worms crap), red flags and sirens should go off. Didn't they use any on their own yard and garden, why not.

I am not saying they are ling to you, just do the math....if you have 60 beds, with 10,000 worms in each one about 60,000 worms, and you harvest them every 30 days. You will get at most 30 buckets of castings...........that is a pretty good bit, maybe even a 1/3 of a yard, providing you don't use any or sell any then logically in 3 months you would have a yard. But that's only one sale of one yard, once it is gone you wouldn't have any left. There is only about 6 good harvest months out of the year in Ga. because of temp. and weather.

60 beds full of worms is a fair size, lets double it to 120,000 worms and I only know about 6 in Ga. that have that many or more. The math would say you could possibly in a perfect world, under perfect conditions, not selling any worms or castings for 6 months, you might get 4 yards of castings.

Keep in mind, with that many worms, and that much harvesting, feeding and watering, you would have to have at least 2 and likely 4 people or more helping with the up keep.

Don't get me wrong, there are a few worm farms that aculy have a yard or two for sale, but you wont find them on Craig's list for 100 per yard.

So, you are asking, how or what are the doing.......well there are lots of things, basically sifting compost. And or uneaten vermicompost.

I prefer to see the GLOW on a persons face, when they show me pictures of their, huge and bountiful crops.

and another thing.........................................the magic of worm castings.......................is....................

you only need a pound, one pound of castings will make 50 gallons of (fertilizer/tea) And that is alot of tea........................

Fertilizer is the wrong word, when you apply 10-10-10 or other fertilizers, you kill all the live organisms in your garden, raised bed or yard and give them a synthetic vitamin shot, when you eat the fruits or veggies, that is what you are eating, but what is worse.....the soil is dead and lets in all the bad micro organisms, organisms, bugs and other bad things.

When you use worm tea made from worm castings, you are doing just like 03-03-03 and can do it over and over with out burning, organic, so when you eat your bounty that is what it is. and the soil is ALIVE, with millions and millions of micro organisms killing anything bad. That is their food.....that's just the start......next year will be even better, and the next even better and so on. not at all like a fertilizer that you must apply over and over. Yes you can re apply tea over and over, but once your yard and garden comes back to life, it will maintain itself. this is the first year I have had so many tomato s, not one had brown spot, the list is endless.. I have only be totally free of all synthetics for 2 years.

back to the point, you dont need a ton of castings. that is the magic.......and there IS, a difference in castings, type, age, worms used, feed used for the worms and more......

This post is copyrighted, feel free to copy and paste as long as you include my name and webpage.

Tim Herron http://www.herronfarms.webs.com

END OF THE WORLD SALE

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on December 16, 2012 at 9:20 AM Comments comments (0)

This Friday December 21, 2012

Herron Farms of Dawsonville, will not be having an "End of the World Sale".

 

 

I am sure something is in the works, as the Myans were not dumb people, and have provided us with many importaint peice's of information. I personally believe the end of time may be close, mostly from my understanding of the book of Revelations and what we are doing to ourselves, with the Drugs and the hatred to one another. But what is Close? One Day, or many Years? Know one knows this.

 

http://www.kareforkids.us/festival.html

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on September 14, 2012 at 6:55 PM Comments comments (0)

45th Annual Mountain Moonshine Festivalsm

October 27 & 28, 2012

Registered Rabbits

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on May 3, 2012 at 7:55 AM Comments comments (0)

I can ship just about anything, except rabbits. The only way that I have found is very expensive and prohibitive, as in avg. 500-1500 and to me, that just makes no sense. The postal service will not ship rabbits.

 

I have had people drive from all over, tx. mi. fl.nc.sc.tn.al. and all over Ga. Makes me feel bad.

 

Now about these rabbits, they are not "registered rabbits" they are pure blood rabbits, and I have "pedigree's" for them. They come from a line of Grand champs and Registered rabbits.

 

The trail to get a rabbit is a fairly long one. take a look at the ARBA page. they have to be shown and win several "legs" to even be considered. Then you take the rabbits to a judge of your choice and pay a small fee for them to examine the rabbit. and then the tat. the right ear.

Then, you typically "breed" that rabbit, and sell the off spring, but never the Registered rabbit, that is your money maker. Once the rabbit has a registration number tattoo'ed in his right ear, any one can look up the numbers, and see the info. on that rabbit.

 

By being a member of ARBA, I am able to buy stamps and pedigree books, I am also able to fill out the pedigree's under penalty for lie's. But the pedigree is no more than a "linage" of that animal, It is up to you to turn the rabbit into a Grand champ.

Hope that helped some.

 

 

Worm Tea

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on April 1, 2012 at 2:45 PM Comments comments (0)

4-8 cups Herron Farms Organic Earthworm Castings

¼ cup sulfur free molasses

1 Tbsp water soluble sea plant extract-kelp or seaweed

2 Tbsp soluble fish powder or liquid fish emultion

4+ gallons Chlorine free water / rainwater

(Note: If you have chlorinated water, fill your pail and let it sit overnight uncovered, and the chlorine will evaporate. Alternatively, accelerate the process by putting the water in your brewer and turning the bubbler on. You will know the chlorine is gone when you cannot smell the chlorine anymore – probably in as short a time as 20-30 minutes. You can verify the absence of chlorine by purchasing a simple chlorine test kit from a local pool supplier.)

Tea Brewer components:

Min. 5 gallon plastic pail, bucket or barrel

Air pump with air stone or some other air dispersal device (remember: small bubbles are superior).

Sieve (a 5 gal. paint bucket filter works well)

Elastic band or a twist-tie to close the Sieve

Directions:

First, ensure that all components are clean and there are no buildups or areas of your brewer that will prevent the circulation of air and water. (If the stone builds up residue just soak it overnight in pure white vinegar).

In a 5 gallon pail, fill with 4 gallons or so of warm water with the molasses, seaweed extract, and liquid fish. Turn on the pump with the hose and stone attached before placing the stone into the solution. Leave the pump running when removing the stone from the brew to keep water from entering the stone.

Place the air-stone or other bubbler at the bottom of the pail. For best results, ust the ‘open brew’ approach by placing the Barefoot Soil Organic Earthworm Castings directly into the water. (You can always strain the castings later if you are going to use a sprayer for the Teas’ application.) Alternatively, put the BFS Organic Earthworm Castings into the sieve and place it into the pail over the bubbler.

Brew until a noticeable frothy slime (“bio-slime”;) develops on the surface of the water and the smell of the ingredients is very weak or no longer present. The absence of noticeable fish and molasses odor indicates that the microorganisms have consumed the ingredients! Once the food is gone the populations will begin to decrease. On warm summer days, you can begin a brew in the evening, and the tea will be ready for application the next morning. We find brewing is complete in as little as 12 hours if the brew is kept warm. Hence, brew times are heavily dependent on the water temperature. With every 10 degree F drop in temperature, brew times increase by 12 hours.

Be sure to keep the tea aerobic by leaving the bubbler on until you use the tea since cutting off the oxygen supply will down spike the population and diversity.

While brewing, the population of beneficial microorganisms will be doubling in as little as every 20 minutes. By the end of the brew, your solution can contain over one billion little critters per teaspoon of tea!

Apply the tea when the populations of microorganisms are at their highest number and diversity. Spray the tea onto foliage, stems, roots and surrounding soil, or simply pour it onto you plants and vegetation. Remember, Castings Tea Everything! Spray early morning or in the evening or in the shade, not in the sunshine.

When you are finished, use the left over castings for your soil amendment needs. Do not discard them! These castings should have higher population densities than what you started with, because remember, you brewed an exceedingly large population, and they will adhere to the castings!

Herron Farms, Dawsonville 706-531-4789

 

African Nightcrawlers

Posted by Tim Herron Farms on January 8, 2012 at 8:20 AM Comments comments (0)

Eudrilus Eugeniae-The African

 

as a kid, In the 70s. I raised redworms-under my rabbits. I had read about these "hybread, or African" red worms, and was led to beleave, they were hard to raise, would wander off, and they couldent survive the cold.

After many years of tring to get my redworms, to a larger size. I tried the african or so called hybread redworm. to find to my dissbeleaf, all I had read was not rue at all, and likely put into print and now the internet by Redworm farmers that did not want to loose there sales.

I now have so many Africans, my only concern, is how to keep them all fed. They are to me the easyest worm to raise, yes they "prefer" a warm temp. but produce and feed at the same temp as the common red worm.

When it gets real cold out side "all of your worms may die-----Redworms, Europeans, and Africans...

no worms do well at 20 or 30, or even 40 degrees, so what is the big deal?

Africans, out preform any other worm, in North America. and that is a fact-by someone that raise's Africans, Redworms and Europeans.

http://www.herronfarms.webs.com

Tim Herron

Dawsonville Ga.


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